When religion and ecology meet…

I bang my head on the desk. Here is an excerpt from a speech given by Tony Abbott in Canberra last night…

“Man and the environment are meant for each other. The last thing we do – the last thing we should want – if we want to genuinely improve our environment is to want to ban men and women from enjoying it, is to ban men and women from making the most of it and that’s what you do. You intelligently make the most of the good things that God has given us.”

Allow me to translate…

Genesis 1:28 And God blessed them. And God said to them, “Be fruitful and multiply and fill the earth and subdue it and have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over every living thing that moves on the earth.”

Genesis 1:26 Then God said, “Let us make man in our image, after our likeness. And let them have dominion over the fish of the sea and over the birds of the heavens and over the livestock and over all the earth and over every creeping thing that creeps on the earth.”

I think the key here is the final sentence, “You intelligently make the most of the good things that God has given us.” The problem is, Tony Abbott is not an intelligent man. Relying on the Bible to inform you about decisions that should be soundly informed by science is not intelligent. Presumably, if Tony Abbott was intelligent, he would recognise the contradiction between what he says and what he does and he would certainly understand the inference in the first sentence of this excerpt. He basically states that man and the environment depend on each other for survival and he absolutely correct…but not in the way that he probably thinks.

While we exist, we do indeed need the environment for our survival, and while we exist, the environment needs us for its survival in that it needs us to look after it and not over-exploit it for resources or damage it. I am 100% confident that if humans disappeared tomorrow, the environment and every living thing in it would breathe a collective sigh of relief and just get on with living and under a lot less pressure. What Tony Abbott doesn’t seem to understand is that it we are more than capable of damaging the environment to the point that it can no longer sustain human life on it. As most of my readers are intelligent, there is no need for me to go beyond referring to the end-Permian extinction that resulted in no land animal bigger than about 10kg surviving and 90% of living things disappearing. Tony Abbott doesn’t get it. It is beyond his abilities and highlights the lies in his speech.

More and more I am convinced that Tony Abbott is cut from exactly the same cloth as a large number of the loony far right Republicans in the USA, the hypocritical Bible literalists, who use their faith to justify pretty much any decisions they make no matter how wrong or stupid.

So, what does Tony Abbott view as intelligently making “the most of the good things that God has given us”? In the case of Tasmanian forests where he wants to liberate the trees, it is less of this…

and more of this…

Less of these…

and more of these…

To read all of Tony Abbott’s speech, put on your headgear, keep a bucket handy and go here.

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6 Comments

Filed under Classic denier comments, Climate Change, denier contradictions, idiot politicians, Rogue's Gallery

6 responses to “When religion and ecology meet…

  1. Astonishing. I am speechless…

  2. Averil

    Has this man no shame…and to “try” and use God in his speech such an insult. Leave our forests alone and “unlock” your brain…Our trees are not “locked” as the PM implies he is back in the 50’s

  3. Gregory T

    I am totally amazed, that the one human trait, that has caused more pain, suffering, destruction and death, then any other, is Stupidity. And yet it is the least studied human characteristic.We have spent billions in the study of intelligence and ignorance, granted, with little to show for it. But the elephant in the room, still remains, stupidity and politicians the ringmasters.

  4. Bernard J.

    It seems that you’re missing an image immediately before the wedgie. What you probably meant to include was something like this, which is actually a rather tidy depiction of the aftermath of the Tasmanian brand of felling… I’ve done fieldwork in a number of forests where the destruction is even more stark, and where there were millable ‘specialist’ timber species like myrtle, sassafras, celerytop and blackwood bulldozed to stream-lines and burned.

    And that last photo – about 15 years ago I used to watch trucks like that take logs to a chipping mill. The thing is, back then the logs were one or two to a truck because they were so large, and they were massively buttressed, hollow and covered in moss. Seriously. Have a look at that photo again, and picture the felled trees that were so large that they pushed the support bars out to the sides and rose a metre or more over the tops of the same bars.

    And all for wood chips.

    • I worked down there as a freshwater ecologist for a few years and often followed trucks carrying logs. The saddest thing was that the trees going to make timber were skinny blue gums grown by Gunns on private farms as some sort of tax write off deal for landholders and the old growth trees went to make chips. Talk about doing it the wrong way around.